FIGHT! DOCTOR

FIGHT! DOCTOR

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(Dr. Pete with BJ Penn, Jake Shields, and Bas Rutten. Props to SFGoldman.com)

A fighter’s body is a machine geared for top performance and every machine needs regular tune-ups. Peter Goldman, DC, is one of combat sports’ best mechanics. Dr. Goldman practices a rare branch of chiropractic developed approximately 80 years ago by Dr. Thurman Fleet called Zone Healing, the goal of which is to balance the six interconnected systems of the body: circulatory, eliminative, digestive, glandular, nerve, and muscular with an emphasis on mental strength.

A black belt in Oyama full contact karate and a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt under John Machado, roughly 40% of Dr. Goldman’s practice are martial artists. Each week Fightmagazine.com will check in with the man BJ Penn credits with fixing his neck and Bas Rutten believes put an end to his asthma.

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.— Chris Cariaso earned the nickname “Kamikaze” during his BMX days. He says that sport is more dangerous than MMA, but fighting brings its own share of injuries. For the last year, Dr. Peter Goldman has adjusted the fighter and addressed foot and ankle injuries, allowing for Cariaso to remain a gym rat. He recommends Dr. Goldman to his students and uses Goldman’s visualization techniques “as a big part of my training and I definitely think it meshes well with what I’m trying to accomplish.”

Cariasos most recent accomplishment is the ICSF bantamweight championship, won the same night Lyoto Machida retained his title down state at UFC 104.

“I’ve been a muay Thai fighter since I was 11-years-old. I’ve been fighting pretty much my whole life. I turned pro for muay Thai and found out there’s not much opportunity,” he said. “So I made the switch to MMA and been hooked ever since.”

A blue belt under hard-nosed Ralph Gracie, he states, “the WEC is the place to be” for bantamweight fighters and he wants to enter its ranks. As a Strikeforce veteran, given their talent exchange with lower weight-friendly Dream, he would love to fight for Strikeforce or its business partner them but “would want [Strikeforce] to start promoting a lighter weight class a little bit more and put together a better talent pool.”

No matter where he lands, “Kamikaze” knows that Dr. Pete will be there to put him back together.

For more on Dr. Pete, visit SFGoldman.com.

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dr_pete_banner
(Dr. Pete with BJ Penn, Jake Shields, and Bas Rutten. Props to SFGoldman.com)

A fighter’s body is a machine geared for top performance and every machine needs regular tune-ups. Peter Goldman, DC, is one of combat sports’ best mechanics. Dr. Goldman practices a rare branch of chiropractic developed approximately 80 years ago by Dr. Thurman Fleet called Zone Healing, the goal of which is to balance the six interconnected systems of the body: circulatory, eliminative, digestive, glandular, nerve, and muscular with an emphasis on mental strength.

A black belt in Oyama full contact karate and a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt under John Machado, roughly 40% of Dr. Goldman’s practice are martial artists. Each week Fightmagazine.com will check in with the man BJ Penn credits with fixing his neck and Bas Rutten believes put an end to his asthma.

For more on Dr. Pete, visit SFGoldman.com.

0

dr_pete_banner
(Dr. Pete with BJ Penn, Jake Shields, and Bas Rutten. Props to SFGoldman.com)

A fighter’s body is a machine geared for top performance and every machine needs regular tune-ups. Peter Goldman, DC, is one of combat sports’ best mechanics. Dr. Goldman practices a rare branch of chiropractic developed approximately 80 years ago by Dr. Thurman Fleet called Zone Healing, the goal of which is to balance the six interconnected systems of the body: circulatory, eliminative, digestive, glandular, nerve, and muscular with an emphasis on mental strength.

A black belt in Oyama full contact karate and a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt under John Machado, roughly 40% of Dr. Goldman’s practice are martial artists. Each week Fightmagazine.com will check in with the man BJ Penn credits with fixing his neck and Bas Rutten believes put an end to his asthma.

Tony Blauer didn’t think much of Dr. Peter Goldman’s energy treatment. But after finding an array of testimonials from mixed martial arts top stars, the founder of Tony Blauer Tactical Systems sent a quick text message to B.J. Penn to ensure that Goldman was legit. Penn texted back. Blauer made an appointment.

“1986 through six months ago, I’ve had neck issues for years, he gave me the most amazing releases I’ve ever had and I’ve gone through all kind of chiropractors,” said Blauer, whose High Gear training equipment is worn by the likes of Penn, Randy Couture and Urijah Faber.

“Its pretty freaky because, you know, the points in the back of the head that he indexes and then has you do the visualization, there’s definitely, within seconds there’s a change. You have pain, then the pain is gone.”

With over 30-years of martial arts experience, Blauer developed High Gear to maximize live sparring while reducing risk of injury. His emphasis on safety though, didn’t make him any healthier. Flying out to New York to visit Dr. Goldman initially and to San Francisco just two months ago, the adjustments helped Blauer get closer to the good health he requires to travel the country and showcase High Gear with demonstrations.

“I’m actually [in Somerville, MA] and brought down some of our gear for Marcus Davis, who’s getting ready for his fight in November,” he said, noting Davis knew him from his bouncing days having viewed Blauer’s self-defense tapes.

Blauer, 49, was first injured 23-years-ago after getting kicked in the head while teaching a private “ass kicking” lesson. He doesn’t mix it up with today’s fighters like Davis because his “life expectancy would dramatically alter” although he’s constantly in top gyms like Mark DellaGrotte’s Team Sityodtong and Greg Jackson’s MMA to help fighters work through the pain. A bruise on Davis’ shin made it difficult to work on a regular Thai pad. Enter Blauer’s product.

“He threw on the High Gear shin pad and just banged through his workout,” he said.

Blauer’s first order was for Navy Seals, but as mixed martial arts progresses, innovations like High Gear are in higher demand. Its headgear prevents cuts or broken orbital bones. And his smart foam’s impact reduction technology allows fighters to still feel hits with reduced damage.

“The asset is the fighter,” said Blauer, explaining High Gear makes repetitive, live hits possible with drastically reduced risk of injuring training partners. Since teammates are protected, the offensive fighter builds muscle memory for ground and pound and provides the defensive fighter with more time to work different escapes under real scenarios. Blauer points out some fighters think such gear makes them less tough then counters boxing gloves have more padding to protect the fighter—not the hand.

With Cung Le, Joe Lauzon and Frank Mir employing High Gear, Blauer has worked with some of the best. But singling out his fellow countrymen, UFC welterweight champion Georges St. Pierre and David Loiseau, Blauer highlights the benefit of High Gear.

“Some of their ground and pound was just compared to other people, a different element of precision,” he said.

Despite its benefits, Blauer doesn’t want to call it the future of MMA training, fearing he will “get killed by ninjas” if he does.

“Is it the future? No. It’s definitely a necessary component for a team that is continually trying to reinvent its fighters,” he said. “Its one thing that as a coach, I tell guys, you gotta reinvent yourself. If you’re at the top of the heap, people have more tape on you than you do on them.”

Visit Danny Acosta’s FIGHT! blog for a bonus tidbit from his conversation with Blauer. For more on Dr. Pete, visit SFGoldman.com.

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dr_pete_banner
(Dr. Pete with BJ Penn, Jake Shields, and Bas Rutten. Props to SFGoldman.com)

A fighter’s body is a machine geared for top performance and every machine needs regular tune-ups. Peter Goldman, DC, is one of combat sports’ best mechanics. Dr. Goldman practices a rare branch of chiropractic developed approximately 80 years ago by Dr. Thurman Fleet called Zone Healing, the goal of which is to balance the six interconnected systems of the body: circulatory, eliminative, digestive, glandular, nerve, and muscular with an emphasis on mental strength.

A black belt in Oyama full contact karate and a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt under John Machado, roughly 40% of Dr. Goldman’s practice are martial artists. Each week Fightmagazine.com will check in with the man BJ Penn credits with fixing his neck and Bas Rutten believes put an end to his asthma.

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif.— Twenty-one-years-old, a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu black belt under Eddie Bravo and the owner of a 10th Planet Jiu-Jitsu affiliate gym in San Francisco, Denny Prokopos is just getting started.

It wasn’t long ago that Prokopos met Dr. Goldman, but it seems like a lifetime ago. The positive, energetic grappler says he met the doc at time when, “I had a negative outlook on life.” Prokopos had blown out his right knee wrestling, tearing his meniscus and damaging his LC, MCL, and ACL. He could barely walk let alone train. And just a few weeks ago he he hurt his neck doing muay Thai and when he woke up in the morning, he couldn’t sit up. In both instances, Dr. Goldman got the prodigious jiu-jitsu artist back on the mats.

“Dr. Pete’s one of the most amazing human beings I’ve ever met in my life. That guy inspires me in so many ways. He’s an amazing healer and he’s one of the most positive people I’ve ever met. I’ve never heard that dude say a bad thing about anything,” says Prokopos. At such a tender age, it’s hard to imagine Prokopos has the life experience to have met many great people, but this is a grappler who has been sought out for training by legends such as Frank Shamrock and Randy Couture.

“If it wasn’t for him, I wouldn’t be fighting. That’s the truth,” adds Prokopos, who has been teaching since he was 14.

Prokopos was part of San Francisco’s hard line gi jiu-jitsu community before aligning himself with Bravo. A part of the controversial no-gi and rubber guard movements, Prokopos shares his instructor’s pro-marijuana stance. And for all the negative attention each position attracts, Prokopos has a counter.

“I know we get a lot of positive [attention] but I know we get a lot of negative [attention], but I focus on the positive,” he says, citing results are all that matters. “I’ve learned that from Dr. Pete. I’ve learned that from Eddie too.”

Fresh off of his no-gi nationals victory, the recently promoted black belt plans to fight in mixed martial arts. He’s had three amateur bouts, all wins coming by submission. But he admits there were no strikes on the ground and taking up fighting is a full-time occupation he’s not ready for. He is busy settling his personal life and building his school. Still, he absolutely wants to test himself in the cage or ring.

“When I fight, I fight to win. If I’m gonna do something to be the best at it or else there’s no point in me doing it. I can’t get up and train and think I’m not gonna be the best,” he says. It’s something he’s learned over these past few formative years. When he feels all-or-nothing “about MMA, then that’s when I’ll get into it.”

Enthusiastic and studious about everything he does, Prokopos calls on his Zone Healing studies to elaborate.

“The concepts that you have or something that you hold in your head manifest in your physical reality,” he says, “So I would say the most important thing I learned from Pete is how to monitor my thoughts and that goes way beyond jiu-jitsu.”

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(Dr. Pete catches Prokopos in a twister. Photo by Danny Acosta.)

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dr_pete_banner
(Dr. Pete with BJ Penn, Jake Shields, and Bas Rutten. Props to SFGoldman.com)

A fighter’s body is a machine geared for top performance and every machine needs regular tune-ups. Peter Goldman, DC, is one of combat sports’ best mechanics. Dr. Goldman practices a rare branch of chiropractic developed approximately 80 years ago by Dr. Thurman Fleet called Zone Healing, the goal of which is to balance the six interconnected systems of the body: circulatory, eliminative, digestive, glandular, nerve, and muscular with an emphasis on mental strength.

A black belt in Oyama full contact karate and a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu brown belt under John Machado, roughly 40% of Dr. Goldman’s practice are martial artists. Each week Fightmagazine.com will check in with the man BJ Penn credits with fixing his neck and Bas Rutten believes put an end to his asthma.

SAN FRANCISCO, Calif. — Dream veteran Darren Uyenoyama and Strikeforce veteran Nik Theotikos have stopped into Dr. Goldman’s office for regular maintenance—to be healed to be healthy for training.

Strikeforce veteran Nik Theotikos and Dream vet Darren Uyenoyama are visiting “Dr. Pete” for regular maintenance. Dr. Peter Goldman has a casual relationship with his clients, many of whom are fighters, partly because of his unorthodox methods.

Theotikos suffers from a long history of back problems but explains he’s training hard thanks to consistent sessions with Dr. Goldman. Like many of Goldman’s patients, he attributes the problems as much to mental and emotional issues as to physiological problems.

“I try to give the person something to kind of visualize to kind of reset some of those experiences the subconscious took in and I find it melts that stuff away and the body heals,” says Dr. Goldman. He’s a fast speaker, with a casual, friendly inviting tone. He’s not trying to sell anything—Uyenoyama and Theotikos are regulars.

“If your head’s not into it, then the body won’t be,” Theotikos states simply.

Uyenoyama couldn’t lift his arm before an early 2008 Strikeforce bout when he first came to Goldman. After some adjustments, Uyenoyama was healed and won the fight via guillotine choke in 87 seconds. In fact, Uyenoyama felt that Dr. Goldman was such an integral part of his success that he asked the chiropractor to corner him in his last fight—a November Strikeforce decision win over Brad Royster.

The proud owner of Faito Tamashii Combat Club in nearby Daly City, Calif., Uyenoyama relates that he’s more energetic even with an accelerated schedule due to Zone Healing, that he doesn’t have to “sip a coffee all day.” He says he doesn’t want to sound hokey but, “it kinda changes your life.”

The Ralph Gracie black belt recently returned from Japan, training with Enson Inoue and Rumina Sato. He’s negotiating with Sengoku, Shooto and Deep, while hoping his relationship with Dream gets him on the Oct. 25 event.

His training partner, Theotikos, is staying busy, training with the Ralph Gracie squad and Jake Shields and Gilbert Melendez. He books his own fights since falling out with his old manager-trainer, which has made it difficult to find a bout, especially one worth taking. But that’s the fight game.

“I’m ready to do a carnival show—anything at this point,” says Theotikos. Despite the setback, he’s ready to compete, and that confidence is due in part to Dr. Goldman. “I know if I’m feeling good, I’m gonna take care of majority of the [opposition].”

Learn more about Dr. Goldman.

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