MMA 101

This month, 2007 ADCC World Champion and undefeated professional mixed martial artist Robert Drysdale shows readers two slick chokes from side control.

There are a lot of benefits to being in side control. You can knee the body, drop elbows to the face, work toward full mount, and hunt submissions. If you are hunting submission, here are two of my favorite chokes that will leave your opponent tapping in no time.

NORTH-SOUTH/HEAD-AND-ARM COMBO CHOKE

1) I begin by holding my opponent in side control.

2) With my left arm, I wrap my opponent’s neck, while making sure that I get my left hip on his triceps. It’s very important that his arm is blocked on my hip and that he’s unable to pull it out.

3) I may need to use my right hand to adjust my opponent’s arm across his neck. My objective is to get his arm all the way up my lat and across his face. This position is a combination between a north-south choke and a head-and-arm choke. My body weight should do the trick to fi nish my opponent, but you can connect your hands to add pressure. It’s important to keep your head low and all of your weight on your opponent. Army crawl backward to force the tap.

MODIFIED D’ARCE CHOKE

1) I begin by holding my opponent in side control.

2) With my left arm, I wrap my opponent’s neck, while making sure that I get my left hip on his triceps. It’s very important that his arm is blocked on my hip and that he’s unable to pull it out.

3) A common reaction from my opponent is for him to try to roll to his knees. Since he can’t roll toward me (because his arm is trapped on my hip), he may try to roll away from me. I anticipate this, and I keep the wrap around his neck to set up my trap.

4) I want him to keep rolling to his knees, and I make sure that I get my forearm under his neck while he is still on his side. I get my left arm deep enough to set up my D’Arce choke.

5) I immediately sit on my left hip to prevent my opponent from getting to his knees.

6) I lock my left wrist into the crook of my right elbow. The blade of my left forearm must be around his neck—not too deep or too shallow. I roll my left wrist into his neck while I push his head in with my stomach, forcing him to tap.

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